Top Menu

Archive | January, 2019

It’s our birthday – 10 years of replacement parts

Image result for vintage 10th birthday

10 years ago today, we listed our first set of Revere Ware replacement parts for sale. Prior to the availability of our parts, there was a 20 year period where new parts were not available at all, as Revere Ware stopped selling any replacement parts in 1989, after being bought by Corning in 1988 (more company history here).

Prior to our parts, the only option for someone looking for the like new look, or to fix a piece that was no longer functional, was a complicated Bakelite refurbishment process that involved repeated sanding with progressively finer sandpaper; very labor intensive, and expensive.

So wish us a happy 10th birthday, and enjoy your Revere Ware for another few decades.

0

RIP Revere Ware 1939 – 2018

We wrote last summer that it appears that World Kitchen / Corelle Brands, the owner of the Revere Ware brand, was preparing to ditch the brand altogether.  This is after coming out with a new line or Revere Ware branded cookware back in 2016.

We got a tip off this week from a customer that tried to contact Revere Ware support:

I contacted by phone World Kitchens and talked to a rep about revere ware warranty replacement of a knob on my 3 quart sauce pan.  She said her company no longer represents revere ware or their warranties anymore.  I am interested in the knob replacement you show for the saucepan as that is the exact knob that will no stay on the screw of my saucepan.

If you go to revereware.com, this is what you see:

There is no mention of Revere Ware anywhere on the site anymore.

The Corelle Brands corporate site also no longer has any mention of Revere Ware.

This seems a very unceremonious end to the Revere Ware brand, to be silently disappeared without any public contemplation, explanation, or appreciation.  The Revere Brand was once the most popular cookware brand in the US.

It would appear that we are the last place you can go for any type of Revere Ware support and replacement.

0

Large pressure cooker sauce pan

Customer Lenora found this oddity at an estate sale.  It looks like the bottom of a pressure cooker, but without the rim to hold the lid on.

My first thought is that someone got frustrated on not being able to use their pressure cooker for lack of replacement parts, and removed the rim, but Lenora says there are no signs of the rim having been worked by hand.

She says:

From what i can see, The rim doesn’t look manipulated at all and we thought perhaps it was a modified pressure cooker too except that the inside bottoms of this pot does not look anything like the bottoms of the pressure cook.  I’d also like to note we live about 15 minutes from Rome, NY and my dad thought perhaps this was a custom piece a worker may have made just on a whim for themselves?? We’ve scoured the internet and really can’t find anything else like it?

And then there is this auction she found for an identical piece.

Perhaps it was a prototype that never made it to production.  This wouldn’t be the first time we’ve seen oddities like this that appear to be one of few of a kind.

Both of them have something extra  on the process patent stamp, a “U” on one and a “G” on the other.

I’ve always thought that pressure cookers would make a pretty good sauce pan or stock pot overall, as have pretty thick walls to handle the pressure, so they spread the heat well, and the bottom tend to stay very flat, but the rim is a bit annoying if all you want is a pan as it gets in the way of a lid.  This seems like the best of both worlds.

0