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Revere Ware and warranty

As people spend more time cooking and more time using their vintage Revere Ware, we’ve gotten a lot more requests recently for Revere Ware warranty service, some of them quite demanding.  People seem to skip right past the disclaimer on our contact form an other places on our site.

Hopefully people will find this post and it will help clarify the situation.

The Revere Ware brand has bounced around among several corporate owners since the 1980’s.  They continued to offer some warranty support until 2018, when the latest corporate owner, Corelle Inc, shuttered the brand and discontinued all warranty support.  So unfortunately warranty support for Revere Ware is now a thing of the past.

In contrast, we are a totally separate company that came on the scene in 2009 and started offering a selection of replacement parts to help you get your cookware in good operating order again, and a lot of helpful Revere Ware related materials.

And we are happy to try to answer just about any question you might have about Revere Ware.  But unfortunately, we can’t replace your broken cookware or provide you with free replacement parts for original Revere Ware cookware under their warranty.

We do however stand by our replacement parts; if you have a problem with them, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

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When Revere Ware began to lose its way

I came across this interesting egg poacher on eBay today.

Now that, to me, looks like they took a muffin tin and called it an egg poacher.  Compare that to the classic egg poacher they sold in the vintage era which is a very classic design.

The muffin tin one is part of the signature collection, which, according to our Photo Guide, was first produced in the 70’s, the period right after quality cookware produced during the vintage era ended.

To me, it is a good reminder of how Revere Ware changed course in a big way after which their products were never as good.

 

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Revere Ware print advertising mats

I found these on eBay and, honestly, I have no idea exactly how they might be used.  The material is some sort of card board.  Here is what the front (proper text orientation) looks like:

And the underside looks like this:

That’s not a blurry picture, that’s what the underside looks like.  My guess is that these are proofs for advertising print plates for newspaper ads.  If anyone has any more information on exactly what these are or how they were used, please contact us.

If you look at the cookware pieces, you will notice that they are the pre-1968 era styles.

 

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Revere Ware stories – Margaret

We received this note from Margaret in Canada a few weeks ago:

I am a Canadian.  Shortly before my marriage in 1958, I drove to the US in order to buy sheets and Revere Ware.  Sheets were better quality than Canadian, and Revere Ware was not available in Canada.
My Revere Ware pots are still in excellent condition, copper bottoms and all, and I just wanted it put on record how well they have lasted.

Thanks for the note Margaret. I’m not old enough to have bought them, or received them, new.  But I do remember my mother having a set (long gone) and my mother-in-law received a set, which we now have, as a wedding present.  And I own a pretty nice set now, all with new handles and hardware. :).

It is a nice reminder of how important Revere Ware has been in many people’s lives, and why it is important to carry on the tradition today.

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Revere Ware and the Manhattan Project

It seems that out site is not only the authority on all things Revere Ware cookware, but we are also now quotable on the history of the Revere Ware company, as evidenced by this article that discusses the Revere Copper & Brass company’s involvement in the Manhattan projects.  Specifically, our Revere Ware history page is quoted.

The story goes that during WWII, Revere Copper & Brass was subcontracted to help build the first atomic bomb:

In the early 1940s, civilian production was halted by World War II, as items such as smoke bombs and cartridges and rocket cases were needed for the war. The Revere Copper plant in Detroit became an avionics, weapons and electronics facility in 1943. And it became a beryllium facility from 1946 to 1950.

The plant made uranium rods under contracts with the Atomic Energy Commission, as well as beryllium ingots, alloys and billets. In the early 1960s, Revere Copper created a thorium bar, which was divided and sent to other AEC plants.

It seems that part of that facility that remains contaminated, collapsed into the Detroit river recently.

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Happy Birthday to Us; a trip down memory lane

A year ago we celebrated our 10 year anniversary of selling new replacement parts for Revere Ware cookware.  If you aren’t familiar, the owners of the Revere Ware brand stopped supplying replacement parts for Revere Ware cookware sometime back in the late 1980’s.  For about 20 years, nothing was available.


We started out supplying a handful of parts in 2009 with this basic website, with sales solely on eBay.

Later that year we introduced handles for the post-1968 single screw pots and Dutch ovens, and switched to this beauty of a site; at that point we started selling through our own site, in addition to eBay.

We also started listing our parts on Amazon.com that year.  Over the last 10 years, Amazon.com has become a bigger and bigger part of our business.

The blue is eBay, red is our own website, and green is Amazon.com.


In late 2010 we introduced post-1968 newer style single screw handles for skillets and sauce pans, as well as the smallest handle for the pre-1968 2-screw line, followed by gaskets for the 1574 and 1576 line of pressure cookers.


In 2012, we switched from shipping things ourselves to hiring a fulfillment center to do the shipping for us.  This helped improve shipping responsiveness, and relieved us of the responsibility of shipping things ourselves, which became increasingly hard with the growing volume of sales and the arrival of our second child (now three) in 2011.  We stopped selling on eBay that year, as it was very difficult to integrate eBay sales into our fulfillment center.


In late 2015 we introduced the replacement, cap & trigger, and handle for the 2 1/3 quart tea kettle.  We also switched the the current version of our website.


In 2016 we completed a design for a 3D printable trigger for the 3 quart kettle, but materials that could withstand the heat weren’t available until 2018, when we added the model to Shapeways for ordering.


And all the while we’ve continued to add to our collection of manuals, repair guides, ads and catalogs recipes, and blog posts on Revere Ware related subjects.

We also started our ReverWare.org eBay listing classification site in 2010, with major updates in 2014 and 2019.  If you aren’t familiar, it makes finding the right replacement Revere Ware piece on eBay a snap.

For the last 11 years, it has been our pleasure to do something nice for the community of Revere Ware owners, fans, and enthusiasts.  Enjoy!

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If you love Revere Ware, consider cast iron

We are probably one of the most enthusiastic fans of Revere Ware cookware, so much so, that we decided to start supplying replacement parts that were no longer available (hence this site and store).

But our enthusiasm for vintage cookware extends beyond Revere Ware, with a nice collection of Pyrex bowls, Corning Ware, and many well made vintage utensils.

What we like about the vintage stuff is that is made so much better than the most of what is available today, and it is relatively cheap.  Given the choice between modern aluminum and non-stick cookware or some beautiful vintage Revere Ware at the same price, we would take the Revere Ware every day.  Modern Pyrex is made of cheaper glass that breaks more frequently than the old stuff.

Along these lines, some of our favorite cookware pieces are our cast iron pans.  We picked these up from thrift stores more than ten years ago, seasoned them well, and have been using them almost daily since.  They have a permanent spot on our stove top, a large one and a medium one.

To be sure, cast iron is definitely in these days, with small boutique makers charging hundreds of dollars for pieces made by artisans in small batches.  But that just smacks of trendy nonsense to us.  We are perfectly happy with our ten dollar thrift store finds.  In our experience, almost every thrift store has some cast iron pans (just like we’ve found them to be a great source for Revere Ware lids).

However, an article I recently came across has me pining for some vintage cast iron to add a little more history to our stove.  As it turns out, cast iron has quite a history, with cast iron vessels being use for over 2,000 years.  The flat cast-iron skillet was introduced in the late 19th century and was really popular through middle part of the 20th century; most households had one.  And restoring an old cast iron pan and re-seasoning it, they seem to work quite well.

Incidentally, one of our favorite ways to use our cast-iron pan is for low-carb cheesy skillet bread.

So here’s to putting more history on our stove as I start searching for my Wagner Ware skillet.

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When things were build to last

I came across this post on Reddit today:

I’ve got a set of both. Saladmaster is what my grandmother used and what I wanted more than anything. It’s what I grew up hearing (they have a steam release tapper) as a child when she prepared her wonderful food. When my grandma passed my grandfather gave me her set.

My mom always swore by Revere Ware 1801 and that’s what I got back in the 90s when I set up house. I’ve acquired a couple more pans since then.

I can sell either but just wanted others opinions on what they think is the better of the two, to keep, with out the emotional value attached.

I realize that neither of these would be used in a professional kitchen.

My husband and I move as DOD contractors every 1-2 years and am looking to size down the household.

I’ve never seen Saladmaster cookware in person, but based on the era it was purchased, I would have to say it has to be better than 90’s era Revere Ware.  As a refresher, Revere Ware made good, quality copper bottom cookware from 1939 to 1968, the stuff with the process patent stamp on the bottom.  Starting in 1968, they went to reduce the cost of the manufacturing and cut in half the thickness of the stainless steel and copper in the cookware.  That made it much less effective at spreading the heat, one of the things Revere Ware was known for.  Fast forwarding to the 80’s, 90’s and up until 2018, when Revere Ware products were discontinued, the quality got worse and worse.

I would happily choose any 50’s / 60’s brand over newer Revere Ware.

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