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Revere Ware brochure from the early days – 1943

I’m always looking for things like brochures to help fill out the Revere Ware information we have an we present here.  An early brochure | price list from 1943 appeared recently and I snapped it up.  You can see all the early styles they have in those first few years of Revere Ware, and how they differ from the style the dominated much of the vintage era, through 1968.

You can find the entire catalog here.  There are some really interesting pieces in there.  The thin lipped skilled for example, with pouring spout.

I happen to have one of these.  The sauce pot with strainer basket is something I hadn’t seen before either; they called it a French fryer.

The double boiler had Bakelite handles, and came in two sizes, 1 1/2 quart and 2 quart, that went with the 2 and 3 quart sauce pans.

 

There is also the deep well cooker we’ve talked about before.

Interestingly what I’ve always heard referred to as the bale handled pot, they call a preserving kettle.

In 1961 they called it a bale handle kettle.

The percolator looks distinctly different from those of later years, with what appears to be a glass knob that looks much like the Bakelite ones.

Here is one from 1953.

I’ll bet the knob proved too fragile like that so they redesigned it.  Lastly, I just love this kettle design.

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Revere Ware is dead, part 2

We’ve reported previously on the abandonment of the Revere Ware brand in 2018 by the new owners Corelle Inc.  Today we discovered it goes further than just discontinuing the production and sales of the product.

We received an email from Amazon.com that one of our listings was closed due to a suspected trademark violation.

We have removed ASINs that can be found in the Suspected Intellectual Property Violations tab of your Account Health, under the Reason “Potential Trademark Text Misuse”.

That made me look to see what trademarks actually exist for Revere Ware, and I found this:

Wow, all trademarks are dead.  That is actually surprising, as it says that no-one actually sees any remaining value in the Revere Ware brand.

Many of them were cancelled in 2002, 2006, 2010, 2012, 2016, and the last one was dropped in 2019.  Seems like the brand has been dying for some time.

The issue with Amazon.com appears to be them thinking we don’t have the right to sell under the brand RevereWareParts.com.

The brand RevereWareParts.com mentioned in the product detail page of the ASIN B001U2E1DY seems to be incorrect.

Hmm.  Well hopefully this page placed on our website is proof enough to them that we own the brand.

Update: Turns out what they objected to was this product listing title:

Revere Ware Pan/skillet 2-screw Handle Replacement Hardware Set (Med, Lg, X-lg Handles) (Two Sets)

They claim that Lg (which is shorthand for Large) infringes on the brand LG.  Just how to you respond to that kind of silliness?

 

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Revere Ware Neptune line

Sometimes people contact us with a question but mistype their email address, so they never get the answer. This happened recently with Reader Tina’s question about her mother’s Revere Ware set.  Hopefully she finds the answer here.  She asks:

I am still using my mom’s copper bottom pans. They have Pictures of seahorses on the handles. I am interested in knowing how popular these were and what is the oldest known pans still in use today. Mine have been well used and loved. Most of the pictures are worn off. The knob came off the top of one of them a few years ago but other than that they still do what they were made for! I don’t know how long my mom had them but i would say this is a testimony to the quality!
You have the Neptune line, produced from 1967 through 1970.  Here is the blurb on that from our Photo Guide:

Given the limited production, I don’t believe there were huge numbers of them sold.  As a relative comparison, if I search “Revere Neptune” on eBay, I get 24 results, vs about 8,000 for ‘Revere Ware”, most of which is the iconic copper bottom stuff that was first produced in 1939 and produced through 2018, when it was discontinued.
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I love a good Revere Ware mystery

A reader requested our help in identifying a Revere Ware item – a set of pans that had no handle.

My wife just found a set of three skillets that have no handles. Might you know what this product was used for and when was it in use?

This isn’t the first time someone has asked this question.  I would have assumed these were pans that lost their handles, but they don’t show any signs that a handle was ever attached.

A little internet searching however turned up a more plausible answer.

We drove a few hours away from our house to a attend a town wide sale which had several estate sales that day also. This was near Rome New York. I asked about these Revere ware pans because they were different from others I have seen. I was told that Rome, NY had a Revere Ware factory and pans that had any factory defects were often taken home by a worker and given to family and friends. Flaws many times were very minor, sometimes the stamp on the bottom of the pan was missing (These pans have no stamp on bottom). There are no handles either and there is not a place for one. Many times these pans were used in the oven, so they didn’t care if it had a handle. So these Revere Ware pans are a rare find, normally found in the towns and surrounding areas that had a Revere ware factory.

 

 

 

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Revere Ware deep well cooker

Reader Richard contacted us to identify an item.

A few years ago someone else asked us to identify a similar item and we were able to determine it is a Revere ware deep well cooker.  Here are a couple of references to it in various Revere Ware publications.

The deep well cooker dates back to somewhere in the early 1940’s.  How exactly it is used isn’t entirely clear.  Richards appears to fit quite nicely inside his bale handle pot, which make me think you would use it like a double boiler of sorts such that the heat applied to the bottom via the stove would spread out and cook from the bottom and the sides.  However, our own photo guide (assembled by a gentleman who is sadly no longer with us to clarify) states:

Deep Well Cookers (used in special stove-top “heat pits”) were common in 1930’s kitchens. However, post-war changes in cooking habits, stoves with smaller cook tops, and sealed ovens made them obsolete. Both items were discontinued by the early 1950’s.

Here is an example of such a stove setup:

My beautiful picture

Apparently these deep wells had heavily insulated sides that I’m guessing would cause the heat to surround the pot and cook from the sides as well as the bottom. Additionally, some of them had control knobs would allow for a timed period of high heat after which the control would automatically switch to low for a long simmer.

From all the discussions I found related to deep well cookers, it seems pretty clear that they were generally used in these stoves with a deep well.  But seeing Richards’s deep well insert inside the bale handle pot makes me wonder if the double-boiler type setup might provide much the same effect. And the way the bale handle attaches to the pot, such that it flares out which just-so-happens to create the perfect amount of clearance for the deep well insert, really makes me wonder if this wasn’t an intentional use.

I’d love to pick one up someday and try it out.  My wife used a vintage (avocado green) crock pot for many years and now is in love with her Instant Pot.  If the water bath works, adding this to our kitchen would great.

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Colored handles – some are and some aren’t

In our periodic investigation of colored Bakelite handles, and whether they are really colored Bakelite or just painted, today’s eBay listings give some great examples.  Here is what appears to be a real colored Bakelite handle:

The fact that the box shows a colored handles is a pretty good indicator.

You can also look into the screw holes and see that the color appears to be through and through.

On the other hand, take a look at this white knob:

 

It clearly shows signs of being painted:

so I think the answer is, some are truly colored and some are painted. Whether painted by a Revere Ware owner or by Revere Ware itself, who knows.

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Prices then and now – 1977 vs 2020

Here is a small snapshot into inflation.  Consider this play Revere Ware set from a 1977 Sears catalog.

It is hard to imagine a play set like that selling for $6.24 when you consider what that can buy today (a Starbucks Latte or thereabouts).

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Revere Ware and warranty

As people spend more time cooking and more time using their vintage Revere Ware, we’ve gotten a lot more requests recently for Revere Ware warranty service, some of them quite demanding.  People seem to skip right past the disclaimer on our contact form an other places on our site.

Hopefully people will find this post and it will help clarify the situation.

The Revere Ware brand has bounced around among several corporate owners since the 1980’s.  They continued to offer some warranty support until 2018, when the latest corporate owner, Corelle Inc, shuttered the brand and discontinued all warranty support.  So unfortunately warranty support for Revere Ware is now a thing of the past.

In contrast, we are a totally separate company that came on the scene in 2009 and started offering a selection of replacement parts to help you get your cookware in good operating order again, and a lot of helpful Revere Ware related materials.

And we are happy to try to answer just about any question you might have about Revere Ware.  But unfortunately, we can’t replace your broken cookware or provide you with free replacement parts for original Revere Ware cookware under their warranty.

We do however stand by our replacement parts; if you have a problem with them, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

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When Revere Ware began to lose its way

I came across this interesting egg poacher on eBay today.

Now that, to me, looks like they took a muffin tin and called it an egg poacher.  Compare that to the classic egg poacher they sold in the vintage era which is a very classic design.

The muffin tin one is part of the signature collection, which, according to our Photo Guide, was first produced in the 70’s, the period right after quality cookware produced during the vintage era ended.

To me, it is a good reminder of how Revere Ware changed course in a big way after which their products were never as good.

 

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