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Here is an interesting piece currently for sale on eBay, a 10 quart stock pot.

First of all, what a great starting price for a new in box (NIB) item, only $35.  If you are looking for a nice Revere Ware stock pot, I’d jump on this.

What makes this interesting is the confluence of styles.  On the one hand, it has the vintage handles.

On the other hand, it does not have the process patent stamp, which I’ve always seen on this style stock pot (with those handles).

I also don’t believe I’ve ever seen a 10 quart stock pot with those style handles.

My guess is that this is something that was produced around 1968, just when Revere Ware was transitioning from the vintage era to the newer (cheaper) era of cookware.

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Orange Bakelite

I still don’t understand the reasons Revere Ware made some colored Bakelite parts, but we do come across them from time to time.  Occasionally, they sell for ridiculous amounts on eBay.

Lynda sent us these pictures of her sauce pan with orange Bakelite parts.

So far, we’ve seen yellow, white, blue, and orange colored Bakelite.  And of course, black. 🙂

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Tweener sauce pan

Customer Phil sent us photos of his unique Revere Ware sauce pan, the second one of this type he has seen.  It has the process patent stamp on the bottom but has the handle of the post-1968 type cookware.

From my experience owning some 100 different Revere Ware pieces, and looking through  thousands more on eBay and in thrift stores, I’ve never seen one of this type, so they must be pretty rare and unique.

My only guess is that perhaps this was an intermediate prototype that was developed internally to Revere Ware during the period of the transition, and taken home by an employee.

Anyone else have any unique pieces they want to share with the Revere Ware community?  Please contact us and send us some pictures.

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Google Trends and interest in Revere Ware

We occasionally get asked by people outside the US and Canada whether we ship to other countries.  We don’t presently.  Every country has unique shipping requirements and takes some effort to support; sales to that country have to be worth that effort.

Google Trends allows you to peer into Google search queries to see how popular they are over time and by region.  Here is a search for Revere Ware:

What this shows is pretty clear:

1. Interest in Revere Ware is declining over time.  In the last 14 years, interest has dropped by about 3/4.

2. Interest is entirely limited to the United States.

For us, this means that, there almost certainly isn’t enough demand in other countries to justify the effort to support shipping there.  We do support Canada, which we only sell the occasional part to, but that work is already behind us.

Lastly, it is interesting to see that Google searches mirror what we see ourselves in interest in our products; a yearly cycle of interest that peaks around the holidays and is lowest around mid-summer.  This must have something to with replacement parts for Revere Ware being the perfect holiday gift for that hard to shop for parent or grand-parent.

 

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The Beauty and Pleasure of vintage revere ware

Customer Judy perfectly captured our thoughts on Revere Ware with this comment:

When I married in 1979 it was very hard to find Revere cookware. I know it was still being made, but it was not easy to find unless you lived in larger urban areas. My mother had (& still has) Revere. However, she wasn’t going to let me have it. When my last cookware needed replacing, I was in a pickle. I was fed up with imported junk and could not find anything I liked. Then, I came across a small used pot and bought it. It was love at first cook. Even with a ding and slight warp in the bottom, it cooked better than anything I have ever owned. Since then I have been a regular at second hand stores looking for Revere cookware. I love it. Today I found a skillet with double circle stamp. Someone once asked me it I was going to resell a piece that I had in my buggy. NEVER!

 

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Revere Ware refrigerator magnets?

When we started selling Revere Ware replacement parts 8 years ago, we bet on the fact that, with an installed base going back to the 40’s, there would be a lot of people passionate about their vintage cookware like we were.  In the 9 years since, our business has grown at a moderate but health clip, and in all the ways you might measure the level of interest in all things Revere Ware, interest in the vintage cookware brand has grown considerably.

For example, the number of listings for Revere Ware cookware at any given time has roughly quadrupled in that time period.  Similarly, the number of impressions we see for our Adwords ads every month has more than doubled (meaning, people are searching a lot more on Revere Ware related terms).

However, I think the best indication that the vintage Revere Ware brand is seeing a revival is the fact that someone is making new refrigerator magnets out of vintage Revere Ware ads, and they appear to be selling.

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Competing against ourselves on Google Adwords

If you regularly read our blog posts, you know that, in addition to writing about topics that are helpful for owners and fans of Revere Ware cookware, we also like to write about our experience running an online business.

Today’s topic is Google Adwords, something which is pretty essential for running almost any online business.  If you don’t get traffic, you can’t make sales.

Let’s start with this graph that shows the average cost per click we’ve paid since we started the business, about 8 years worth of clicks.

One thing to realize is that, when it comes to most of the keywords we advertise for, like “revere ware parts” or “revere ware handle” we are the only business providing these parts.  You might think that there is little to no competition for the Adwords phrases we pay for, and you would be right.  By any standard, the amount we pay per click is tiny.  Some businesses will pay tens or hundreds of dollars for a single click, while we spend mere pennies.

But still, a curious thing has happened over the last 8 years … our cost per click has continue to trend up.  (There are a couple of anomalies to ignore.  The large spike near the start of the graph was us weeding out keywords that were far too costly for our business, and the downward trend towards the end of the graph before it started going up again was us again weeding out the most costly of the phrases we paid for.)

How is this possible given that we are the only business that does what we do?  Well, we recently discovered the likely reason.  Check out this email we recently got from Google.

Well that’s interesting, we are mostly competing with Amazon.com for keyword phrases.  The strange thing about this is that, well, we are the ones selling our parts on Amazon.com.  So, it appears that Amazon.com, in order to move more of the business for our parts to their website rather than to ours, is purchasing the same phrases as us.

What does this mean to our business?  At one level, not much.  Our net margins of selling through our own website and using a fulfillment center to ship the orders, versus selling on Amazon.com and using Fulfillment by Amazon to fulfill the orders is about the same.  Well, mostly.  Take a look at the graph of our margins over the last 13 months.

As you can see, our website margins (in blue) are right in line with the Amazon margins (in red), except for the last two months.  Our fulfillment service has a certain fixed cost for using the service (base cost that doesn’t change every month) and then a variable cost per order (handling, packaging materials, postage).  If our website sales get too low in any month (in the summer months we do about half the volume per month than in the winter months) then there aren’t enough order such that the shipping charges sufficiently offset the fixed costs.  This affect is smaller if you consider the full year, but, if the proportion of our sales that are sold through Amazon.com continues to go up, eventually it simply won’t be profitable for us to sell through our own website anymore; we will at some point start losing money on every order.   Selling through our own website is beneficial, as it allows us to keep much more in touch with our customers, and get direct feedback from them, than selling through Amazon.com, so that would be a shame.

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